Faculty Mentors

All student teams must work with an faculty advisor at their school as they develop their projects.  The faculty mentor will offer guidance, feedback, help with communication between students and Bedford 2020, and remind students about resources, goals and deadlines.

Faculty mentors for finalist teams are encouraged to attend the Finals in the spring.  We greatly appreciate faculty mentors and want to recognize you at the Finals!

Bedford 2020 will offer support to students throughout the contest

We hope faculty mentors will encourage students to take advantage of these opportunities.

  • Ideas, Inspiration and Questions Answered. At the kickoff meetings Bedford 2020 staff and volunteers are there to help students brainstorm ideas for projects.
  • Expert Advice and Resources. Teams refine project ideas with the help of community “experts” at the Incubator workshops.  Information will also be presented about behavior change, how to put together a budget, and what is required for the Round 1 proposal and presentation. This event is mandatory and if students are not going to attend, they must let us know.
  • How to Score Well. Encourage students to use the Round 1 SCORE-IT worksheet like a rubric when preparing their written proposal. The judges are asked to review proposals prior to the presentations (but please encourage student to prepare the oral presentation as if the judges have not read the written proposal).
  • How to Present Well.  At Round 1, students will have 3 minutes to present and 2 minutes to answer questions. Students are encouraged to practice their oral presentations with a faculty member and again, use the SCORE-IT like a rubric.
  • Public Speaking Experience and Feedback. All student participants will watch the Round 1 presentations and are encouraged to bring family, friends, and faculty mentors.
  • Finalist Support and Feedback. Finalists will receive funding approvals and get feedback from the Round 1 event. There will be another opportunity to meet with community experts to learn more about data collection methods and receive help on their specific project. Students will earn a point towards the final event for attending this workshop.
  • Mid-Way Check-In. Short Update will be due in early February and is a “check in” that milestones are being completed and to see if finalists need further support from community experts. Students will earn a point towards the final event for completing this form on time.
  • Get Funded. Purchase orders must be filled out and submitted to be reimbursed for approved expenses.  Students will earn a point for using their budget and other resources effectively.
  • Final Report and Power Point Presentations. Students will earn one point towards their final score for on-time submission of the final report and presentation.
  • Finals – Everyone is a Winner. Students will be presented with certificates from the County and are strongly encouraged to bring friends and family to this fun event. We encourage faculty mentors to also attend.  Students will earn one point for practicing their presentation with a faculty member (and having the faculty member email us that they did this) prior to the Finals. Students and faculty mentors are asked to come up on stage at the end of the event for photos and a short reception with the judges.

Resources for Greenlight Competitors

In addition to the many opportunities for feedback and help above, the Greenlight Award Toolkit has forms, inspiration and resources for participants. We also have set up Group Me app group chats for students to get reminders from us. Click here to sign up for one.

Forms for Greenlight Competitors

Intent to Participate Form: Here

All teams must fill out this form with a general outline of their project in order to be entered into the competition.

Project Proposal Form: Here

Your students should use these questions on this form as a guide to formulate and design their proposal.

Scoring Rubric: Here

Teams should look over this rubric closely as they create their Round One and Final Presentations.

Contact:

Faculty mentors are encouraged to contact us if you have any questions or concerns.

Greenlight 2017-2018 GroupMe Chats

Please select the appropriate link below for your school’s Greenlight GroupMe Chat.  By selecting a link you will be joining a group message which Bedford 2020 will use to keep you updated and informed about the Changemaker 2020 Greenlight Award Competition.

 

Fox Lane:

John Jay:

Harvey:

Horace Greeley:

Rippowam Cisqua:

Say hello to your farmer!

by Karen Simons

At Mobius Fields in Katonah, farmer Deb Taft is carefully harvesting produce whose flavors, fragrances, textures, color and nutritional benefit are at their peak. She is thinking of her farmers’ market customers while she harvests and looks forward to sharing her efforts. Saturday, at the market, you’ll find her quietly sitting behind her table, ready and willing to discuss the bountiful crops—how she grew them, how to store them, how to use them. 

At farm markets everywhere, local farmers love to talk to you about the products they are selling. Some farmers will speak to you as soon as you approach their stand, others like Deb, wait for you to ask the questions.

Next time you’re at the farm market take the time to chat with the person behind the table.

Not sure how to start?

Here are some quick tips:

  1. Ask what’s in season, and what’s coming up next. This is a great way to learn more about food seasonality and culture.  Farmers will tell you it’s best to tear up the shopping list and prepare meals made with fresh in-season ingredients. 
  2. See something you don’t recognize? Take the leap, ask what it is, how to store and prepare it. You’ll find some hidden treasures and expand your palate. 
  3. Learn about growing practices. If you want to eat foods raised without chemicals, ask farmers how the food is grown.  Not all farmers are certified organic but may have growing methods that meet or exceed organic certification standards.
  4. Get to know YOUR farmers. If you have time and are feeling chatty (and the farmers are not rushing to help customers) ask how is the growing season going?  How did you get into farming? Where are you located? Can I visit the farm?
  5. Give FEEDback! If you enjoy the food, make sure to go back and tell the farmer you purchased it from. Your positive feedback can help farmers decide what to grow in the future and if you’re lucky, you’ll reap the benefits next growing season!

There are lots of farm stands and farm markets to attend. Click here for our Northern Westchester/Lower Putnam map!

Water and Land Use Task Force List

MEMBERS
campbell Elyse Arnow Brill
Pound Ridge Land Conservancy
needham Rod Christie
Executive Director, Mianus River Gorge
greco Lori Ensinger
President, Westchester Land Trust
greco Amy Gallen
Member, Rusticus Garden Club
mitchell Pat Kessee
Rusticus Garden Club
greco Nancy Kroenenberg
Member, Bedford Garden Club
needham Heather Langham
President of Board of Directors, John Jay Homestead
cutler Mimi Lines
Bedford Garden Club, Landscape Designer
needham Virginia Maybank
Co-founder, Branch Out!
Ann B. Paul
Director, Westmoreland Sanctuary
Karen Sabath Karen Sabath
Founder, Hudson Valley Natural Beekeepers, and Beekeeper, Rainbeau Ridge Farm
greco Simon Skolnik
Chair, Town of Bedford Conservation Board
greco Glenn Ticehurst
Principal, Benedek & Ticehurst
Don Weeden
Executive Director, Weeden Foundation

Water and Land Use Task Force

MEMBERS
campbell Elyse Arnow Brill
Pound Ridge Land Conservancy
needham Rod Christie
Executive Director, Mianus River Gorge
greco Lori Ensinger
President, Westchester Land Trust
greco Amy Gallen
Member, Rusticus Garden Club
mitchell Pat Kessee
Rusticus Garden Club
greco Nancy Kroenenberg
Member, Bedford Garden Club
needham Heather Langham
President of Board of Directors, John Jay Homestead
cutler Mimi Lines
Bedford Garden Club, Landscape Designer
needham Virginia Maybank
Co-founder, Branch Out!
Ann B. Paul
Director, Westmoreland Sanctuary
Karen Sabath Karen Sabath
Founder, Hudson Valley Natural Beekeepers, and Beekeeper, Rainbeau Ridge Farm
greco Simon Skolnik
Chair, Town of Bedford Conservation Board
greco Glenn Ticehurst
Principal, Benedek & Ticehurst
Don Weeden
Executive Director, Weeden Foundation

BCSD Parent Coffee, June 30, 2017, 11am

RSVP HerePlease email us to attend and let us know the number children you will bring. If you cannot attend but would like to be involved, please contact us.

Growing Questions?

  • How do I stave off the Japanese Beetles this year?
  • Why aren’t my tomato plants growing?
  • When should I harvest my garlic?

Growing vegetables, fruits, herbs or flowers usually also grows questions! We try to print information that is seasonal and helpful to all growers, but every garden (and every gardener) is different.

from awaytogarden.com

So this edition of VegOut explores one resource that we really like, A Way to Garden, a blog by Margaret Roach, “a leading garden writer for 25 years—at ‘Martha Stewart Living,’ ‘Newsday,’ and in three books. [She] hosts a public-radio podcast; …lectures, plus holds tours at [her] 2.3-acre Hudson Valley (NY) Zone 5B garden, and always say no to chemicals and yes to great plants.”

This blog is funny, smart and really helpful. Margaret Roach talks about gardening as not just a hobby but a way of life and her love of the practice of growing things really shines through.

Some links to what you will find there, of just start at the home page and explore for yourself.

We hope you find the answers you’ve been looking for and a whole lot of inspiration to keep growing!

Amberjack with Radishes and Basil

With the cold spring many vegetable gardens are not as robust as they were this time last year. Our gardens and farm shares seem to have plentiful basil and radishes right now, so we found a simple recipe with those flavorful ingredients.

INGREDIENTS

  • 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 fillets amberjack,* cleaned and skinned
  • 4 radishes, sliced thinly
  • 2 lemon leaves, torn, or 1 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 2 lemon leaves, torn, or 1 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 1/4 cup white wine
  • 4 leaves fresh basil, torn
  • 1 bunch flat leaf parsley, chopped to yield 1/4 cup
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

DIRECTIONS

In a 12 to 14-inch saute pan, heat the olive oil over medium heat until just smoking.

Season both sides of the fillets with salt and pepper. Add fillets to pan and cook on one side for about 3 minutes.

Turn fillets over when browned and add radish slices and lemon leaves (or zest). Cook for 1 minute and add white wine.

When wine has evaporated, add fresh basil, and season, to taste. Serve immediately.

Recipe courtesy of Mario Batali, 2001

 *Amberjack is an extra lean fish that has a firm texture, white meat with mild flavor. Substitutes  could be mahi-mahi, mullet, tilefish, grouper or shark.

Come to the Greenlight Finals and be Entered to Win!

All are invited to attend the Greenlight Award Finals on May 17th at Fox Lane High School! There will be a Keynote Speaker as well as a free raffle in addition to the inspiring presentations by Greenlight Award Finalists from John Jay, Fox Lane and Harvey School!

 

All who attend will be entered into the raffle for some great prizes! Including:

4 tickets to the Ghostbusters Hyper-Reality Experience in NYC

 

$50 gift card to Salsa Fresca

$50 gift card to Chop’t

$25 gift card to KR Cafe

   

$25 gift card to Squires

Two $25 Gift Cards to Mount Kisco Sports

 

$20 gift Card to the Mount Kisco Diner

Sign up for Community Compost

Town of Bedford residents may sign up to drop off their kitchen waste at the  Town Recycling Center on Saturdays, Tuesdays and Thursdays between 8am-3pm.  Sign up now and we will follow up with you for payment (one-time nonrefundable fee of $25) and pick up or delivery of your Compost Kit.

Community Compost Program Pre-Registration
Help us get Bedford composting! Volunteers can help us spread the word and educate our program participants.