Upcycle Food Scraps

Food scraps and other organic materials can be made into compost and used to nourish the soil, regenerate land, and grow more nutritious food rather than going out with the trash to end up in a landfill or incinerator where they can’t do their magic! Below are some current options for joining the community of composters in our area!

JOIN COMMUNITY COMPOST

Town of Bedford Residents, join Community Compost and bring your organic kitchen waste to the Town Recycling Center on Railroad Ave. Kits available at B2020 office.

COMPOST AT HOME

Have a place in your yard you want to start a compost pile? Click here to Get the Dirt on Composting at Home.

Click here for a fun video about backyard composting.

COMPOST PICK UP SERVICE

Click here to find out about paying to have someone pick up food scraps at your home. Maybe one day we can get this service from our residential haulers in Bedford!

Climate Change Presentation Nov. 5, 2018

Click here for the Press Release about the event.

Please RSVP RusticusGCBedford@gmail.com by 10/30

Cabbage Hill Farm

As Mark Bittman explained at the Bedford 2020 Food Forum, if you want to do something about climate change, “eat less meat, and eat better meat.”  What Bittman meant by better meat – organic, local, sustainably and humanely raised, hormone and antibiotic free – is exactly what the Cabbage Hill Farm Foundation’s mission is all about.

Cabbage Hill Farm Foundation, a nonprofit located on a hillside near Mount Kisco, is a well-known NOFA-pledged organic farm committed to sustainable agriculture, raising rare historic and heritage livestock, and aquaponics.

The farm land is forever preserved by a conservation easement donated to Westchester Land Trust by Nancy and Jerry Kohlberg. The conservation easement enables agriculture to continue on 70 acres, protects environmental features on the land, and ensures the property will not be further subdivided.

Buy local, seek out sustainable, check out Cabbage Hill products! Sustainable, local agriculture results in a smaller carbon footprint, less pollution, supports sustainable food systems, and also produces delicious food.

Where to Find Products

John Jay Homestead Farm Market

Farm Market

You will find Cabbage Hill Farm organic and sustainably raised produce and meats, including beef, pork,lamb, poultry and fish, every Saturday through October at the John Jay Homestead Farm Market from 10am-2pm.

Local Purveyors

Click here for the restaurants, markets and institutions, including at Truck, 273 kitchen, and Mount Kisco Seafood, where you will also find Cabbage Hill Farm products. On the same page you will find a bonus list of 10 reasons to buy local food.

Cabbage Hill Meat Box Subscription (no-commmitment)

Cabbage Hill Farm will continue to sell their meats and fish through their weekly winter no-commitment meat box. Just sign up to get their email at the beginning of each week describing what will be included in that week’s box. If you would like to purchase the box, all you have to do is respond via email and pickup on Saturday between 10am-12pm. The box contains an assortment of Cabbage Hill Farm beef, pork, lamb, and occasionally smoked trout. The price usually ranges from $75-$90 and they also have an assortment of produce available at pickup. To sign up for the meat box or for more information about the meat box, contact Cabbage Hill Farm here.

Plant Garlic in the Fall

Just like tulips and daffodils, garlic bulbs need a cold cycle to grow well.  Get your garlic cloves in the ground 3-6 weeks before the ground freezes and you will be harvesting garlic next June!

Here are some tips we learned from Hudson Valley Seed:

Plant your garlic in early to mid-October.

Plant in location with:

  • full sun in spring and early summer
  • rich and fertile, well-drained, soil
  • free from weeds

Break apart heads of garlic into cloves.

Plant cloves root side down (pointy side up), 2″ deep, at least 6″ apart, in rows 12″ apart.

Water and cover with mulch.

Mark your rows.

In the spring you will see your garlic begin to come up as soon as the soil warms. Rake back the mulch to encourage the soil to warm faster.  Weed and water well, add compost, and cut off the garlic scapes since they will draw energy from the bulb (and taste good, too).

Harvest garlic when about 1/3 of the leaves are dry and brown – sometime in June!

Roasted Pumpkin and Garlic Lasagna

Roasted pumpkin, garlic, sage, cardamom, nutmeg, dried cranberries and apricots… its like eating fall!  We found this recipe from our friends at Meatless Monday who got it from Apron Strings.

Serves 12

  • 1 package lasagna noodles
  • 1 2 pound sugar pumpkin
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 6 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 15 ounces part skin ricotta cheese
  • 1 15 ounce can pumpkin puree*
  • 1 teaspoon cardamom
  • 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 10 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup dried, sweetened cranberries
  • 1/2 cup dried apricots, diced
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 1 tablespoon dried sage
  • 8 ounces lowfat mozzarella cheese, divided
  • 4 ounces parmesan cheese, grated

*canned pumpkin is not the same as canned pumpkin pie filling, which should not be substituted.

Preheat an oven to 350 degrees. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over medium-high heat. When water boils, cook lasagna noodles according to package directions, or until al dente.

Scoop the seeds and strings out of the pumpkin. Cut the pumpkin flesh into large chunks. Toss with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and place on a baking sheet, cut size down. Scatter the garlic cloves over the pumpkin pieces. Roast 60-90 minutes, or until the pumpkin begins to brown and is tender when pricked with a fork. Remove from the oven and let cool slightly.

Using a fork, smash the garlic cloves together in a medium sized bowl. Add the pumpkin puree, green onions, cardamom and nutmeg to the bowl. Stir together with the fork.

When the pumpkin has cooled, remove its skin and cut into smaller cubes.

Line a 13 x 11 inch baking dish with a layer of lasagna noodles. Top 1/4 of the ricotta garlic mixture and another layer of noodles.

Top the 2nd layer of noodles with about 1/4 of the ricotta garlic mixture, then 1/3 of the cranberries, 1/3 of the diced apricot and 1/3 of the roasted pumpkin cubes. Season with 1/3 of the oregano and sage. Finish the layer with 1/3 of the mozzarella and parmesan cheeses. Repeat this layering process 2 more times, or until you are out of noodles, pumpkin, dried fruit, spices and cheeses.

Bake for 30-45 minutes, or until the lasagna’s edges are browned and bubbling.

Want more recipes like this? Subscribe to the Meatless Monday newsletter and visit our Meatless Mondays with Bedford 2020 Archive page!

Plastic Bag Recycling

Now that plastic bags are no longer accepted in Single Stream Recycling, what should we do with them?

The Materials Recovery Facility that takes our residential recycling can no longer efficiently and cleanly separate thin/film plastic items from the other materials and sell them in the recycling market, however most grocery stores and the Town Recycling Center still collect them for recycling. As long as they are clean and separated out from the rest of the trash, they can still be recycled.

The  Containers at the bigger grocery stores and at the Recycling Center accept all types of  polyethylene PE HDPE plastic. 

These plastics often have a recycle symbol number 4 on the bottom. 

Without a visible number, you can use the following as a guideline:

ACCEPTED

  • Bread bags
  • Cereal box liners
  • Consumer product wrapping (the stuff they put around suitcases at the airport)
  • Dry cleaning bags
  • Furniture wrapping (same as consumer product wrapping)
  • Newspaper bags
  • Plastic food storage bags (clean and dry, of course)
  • Plastic retail bags
  • Produce bags
  • Toilet paper, paper towel, and napkin wraps
  • Bubble wrap
  • Ziplock bags

NOT ACCEPTED

  • Cling or food wrap
  • Frozen food bags
  • Prewashed salad bags
  • Pre-packaged food bags
  • Soiled plastic bags
  • Corn plastic or bio-based plastic bags
  • Metallic coated plastic
  • Disposable tablecloth

Thank you for recycling! For more on Single Stream Recycling click here or check the Recyclopedia for information about other hard to recycle items.

Trash Bash

Join us for a waste and recycling festival!

Saturday, October 13, 2018

10am – 1pm

Bedford Hills Memorial Park Pavillion

Food – Music – Fun – Prizes

There will be games, demos and info around the themes of reducing waste:

  • Single Stream Recycling

  • Composting

  • Reusable Bags

  • Plastics

  • Food Waste

  • Zero Waste Parties

  • Recycling Relay Races, Spin the Wheel of Trash, Bash the Trash and more!

  • and materials and info for households who want to participate in the Zero Waste Challenge from October 14 – November 25.

Free! and fun for the entire family!

Amazon Smile Gives Back

You may now support Bedford 2020 with every purchase you make on Amazon! Amazon Smile provides a simple and automatic way for you to support our work in the community by having Amazon make a donation to Bedford 2020 every time you shop.

By clicking HERE or on the image to the left, you will enter AmazonSmile, where you will be asked to sign in to your Amazon account and confirm your choice to support Bedford 2020.

Then, simply shop like you normally do on Amazon by using Smile.Amazon.com every time you shop, and Amazon will donate a portion of your payment back to our organization. Easy!

If you prefer just to make a direct, tax-deductible donation to Bedford 2020, visit our Donate page to learn how. Thank you!

 

Local Food is all Around!

Farmers are growing fruits and vegetables, keeping bees, raising livestock, and tapping maple trees all around us.  Bedford 2020 has compiled a map of nearby farms and where they sell their produce to encourage you to buy local food!

Why buy local food? Buying local food supports the existence of local agriculture and supports our local economy. Food from these small farms is often better for the environment than food that travels long distances from giant agricultural operations. Food that is fresh and in season is good for you.  Finally, there is something amazing about the holistic experience of buying food directly from the farm or the farmer who grew it for you. So, buy local food!

Local Farm Map and List of Where to Buy Their Produce. The map and list below are color coded to help you understand where to buy produce from these farms:

Blue indicates you can buy at the farm because these farms that either sell their produce at a farm stand at or near the farm, through a CSA,* or offer U-Pick on the farm.
Brown indicates farms that distribute off-site to local establishments like restaurants or food markets.**
Green is for farmers markets that bring local farmers and artisans to a central location once a week to sell their produce and products.

If you have more accurate information that what we have here, please let us know and we will update this before we print it and create the interactive version on our website.

title-localfarms

Farms with Local
Farm Stands & CSAs

Amato Farm
121 Route 100, Katonah. Farm stand. AmatoFarm.com

E.B.’s Golden Harvest
Yorktown Heights. CSA, local markets. (914) 962-5666

Fable Farm
1311 Kitchawan Road, Ossining, CSA; Open to the public summer and fall Sat. and Sun. 9am-4pm. FableFoods.com

Farmer and the Fish
100 Titicus Road, North Salem. CSA, Farm stand: daily 10am–8pm, Sun. 10am–4:30pm. FarmerAndTheFish.com

Glynwood Farm
Cold Spring (not shown on map). CSA, Farm store: Tue. & Fri. 3pm–6pm, Sat. 9am–1pm, May–Oct. Glynwood.org

Harvest Moon Farm and Orchard
130 Hardscrabble Rd., North Salem. CSA, farm store: daily, 8am–6pm. HarvestMoonFarmandOrchard.com

Hemlock Hill Farm
500 Croton Ave., Cortlandt Manor. Local restaurants, Farm Store: daily 9am–5:30pm, Sun. 9am–2pm, year round. HemlockHillFarm.com

Hilltop Hanover Farm
1271 Hanover St., Yorktown Heights. CSA, U-Pick, Farm Stand: Sat. 10am–4pm. Farm stand: Fri. 1pm–6pm, Sat. 10am–4pm, June–Nov. HilltopHanoverFarm.org

John Boy’s Farm Outpost
John Boy’s farm is located up in Cambridge, NY, but he sells his products, local meats, and produce at The Outpost at 1 Court Rd. in Bedford Village.

Long Haul Farm
Garrison. CSA. LongHaulFarm

Meadows Farm
329 Underhill Ave., Yorktown Heights. Farm stand: daily 9am–6pm, Sun. 9am–5pm, May–Oct. MeadowsFarmMarket.com

Mill Pond Farm
121 Stone Hill Rd., Pound Ridge. Farm stand: daily.

Pound Ridge Organics
Route 124., Pound Ridge. Micro Farm, Organic Food CoOp; Member pick up Saturdays 12-2 (times may vary). Open year ’round. To join or visit call 914-764-3006 Pound Ridge Organics 

Rochambeau Farm
214 W. Patent Rd., Mt. Kisco. Farm stand: Thu. & Fri. 9am–6pm, Sat. 9am–5pm, Sun. 10am–4pm., seasonal. RochambeauFarmNY.com

Ryder Farm
400 Starr Ridge Rd., Brewster. Local markets, CSA, farm stand. RyderFarmOrganic.com

Salinger’s Orchard
230 Guinea Road, Brewster. Farm stand: 9am–5:30pm daily. SalingersOrchard.com

Snow Hill Farm
North Salem. Local markets, CSA. SnowHillOrganicFarm.com

Stone Barns
Pocantico Hills (not shown on map). CSA, Farm Stand: Sun. 10am–4pm, seasonal. StoneBarnesCenter.org

Stuart’s Fruit Farm
62 Granite Springs Rd., Granite Springs. U-Pick in fall, Farm stand: 9am–6pm daily. StuartsFarm.com

Thompson’s Cider Mill
335 Blinn Rd., Croton-on-Hudson. Farm store: Sat. & Sun. 10am–5:30pm, Sept.–Nov. ThompsonsCiderMill.com

Three Feathers Farm
371 Smith Ridge Rd., South Salem. Gossett Brothers Farmers Market, Farm stand: daily 7am–6pm. ThreeFeathersFarm

White Oak Farm
680 Croton Lake Rd., Yorktown Heights. Farm store: daily. WhiteOakFarm1.com

Wilkens Fruit and Fir Farm
1335 White Hill Rd., Yorktown. U-Pick: 10am–4:30pm. Farm market: 10am–5pm, Sept.–Dec. WilkensFarm.com

Farms that Sell and
Distribute Off-Site

Amawalk Farm
Katonah. Supplies John Jay Homestead Farmers Market. amawalkfarm.org

Amba Farms
Bedford Hills. Supplies Bedford Hills Farmers Market. AmbaFarms.com

Cabbage Hill Farm
Mt. Kisco. Supplies John Jay Homestead Farmers Market. CabbageHillFarm.org

I & Me Farms
Bedford Hills. Supplies area restaurants.

JD Farms
North Salem. Supplies John Jay Homestead Farmers Market. JDFarms.com

Kitchawan Farm
Yorktown.

Mobius Fields
Katonah. Supplies John Jay Homestead Farmers Market. MobiusFields.com

Muscoot Farm
Katonah. MuscootFarm.org

Sugar Hill Farm
Bedford Hills. WestchesterLandTrust.org

Sundial Farm
Ossining.

title-farmersmarkets

John Jay Homestead Farmers Market
400 Jay St., Katonah. Sat. 9am–1pm, June–Nov. JohnJayHomestead.org

Muscoot Farmers Market 
51 Route 100, Katonah. Sun 10am–3pm, June–Oct. MuscootFarm.org

Chappaqua Farmers Market
Sat. 8:30am–1pm, year round. ChappaquaFarmersMarket

Croton-on-Hudson Farmers Market
1 Croton Point Ave. Sun. 9:00am–2pm, May-Nov. DowntoEarthMarkets/Croton

Gossett Brothers Farmers Market
1202 Route 35, South Salem. Sat. 9am–1pm, year round. GossettBrothers

Hudson Valley Regional Farmers Market
Brewster. Sun. 10am–2pm, year round. HudsonValleyRegional

Ossining Farmers Market 
140 Main St., Ossining. Sat 8:30am–1pm, June–Dec 27. DowntoEarthMarkets/Ossining

Pleasantville Farmers Market 
Summer: Memorial Plaza, Pleasantville. Sat. 8:30am–1pm, April–Nov. Winter:  Pleasantville Middle School Cafeteria, 40 Romer Avenue, 9am-1pm. PleasantvilleFarmersMarket.org

Tarrytown/Sleepy Hollow (TaSH) Farmers Market 
Patriot’s Park, Sleepy Hollow. Sun. 8:30am–2pm, June–Nov 19. TashFarmersMarket.org

We hope this map encourages you to get out there and meet your local farmers, frequent some farm stands,  check out the local farmers’ markets, and buy local food!

 *CSA stands for Community Supported Agriculture in which people sign up to buy a share of the farm’s harvest over a specific period of time in the future so that farmers may better plan for the season ahead.

**We have not listed local restaurants and establishments that sell produce from these farms on this map, but on the website version of this map/list we will provide links to farm websites so that you may look into where they distribute their produce.

Snow Hill Farm

Down a gravel driveway lined with trees through the green iron gate lie the beautiful hills of Snow Hill Farm in North Salem, NY. This picturesque setting is home to certified Black Angus cattle, chickens, Dorset sheep, Berkshire pigs, beehives, and two Maremma sheepherding dogs, along with several beautiful produce gardens. If you care about healthy, sustainably grown food, this farm is exactly the kind of place where you want your food to be grown! Snow Hill Farm is certified organic by both NOFA-NY and NOFA-CT. Not only does the farm raise healthy livestock, but it also produces delicious and organic produce available for sale in our area. 

Snow Hill Farm also partners with InterGenerate and Camp Morty to supply them with certified organic produce. Camp Morty hosts children from homeless shelters, in foster care, or on public assistance at a traditional summer camp experience. Each week both organizations pick up produce grown in the Snow Hill Farm gardens. Camp Morty recently used Snow Hill Farm zucchinis in a recipe to teach their campers a great way to enjoy vegetables.

Because they are certified organic, Snow Hill farm uses interesting techniques in its gardens to address insects without using pesticides or chemicals. We asked their farmer for a tip for our readers and she said, to prevent crickets from eating pepper plants, the farm cuts the bottoms out of plastic cups and place them over immature plant stems. Once the stems grow thick enough, the crickets will leave them alone.

If you are interested in products from Snow Hill Farm, you can sign up for their monthly newsletter and weekly emails to be notified about what produce, eggs, or proteins are available. The farm products are prepared at many local restaurants including Bedford Post Inn and Vox. You can purchase their products at The Market at Union Hall and Hayfields.