Local lemon miso dressing

Check out this light, versatile dressing from Adam Strahl of Local

 

LOCAL’s no-oil Lemon Miso dressing

1 cup organic lemon juice

1 cup sweet white miso

1 cup water

1/2 cup agave nectar

 

Whisk the ingredients together and then enjoy over greens, noodles, or roasted vegetables! Covered and chilled, the dressing can keep for up to 2 weeks.

Greenlight Award Video

Greenlight Award Promotional Video from Bedford 2020 on Vimeo.

TIOLI Volunteer Interest Form

Bedford 2020 Take it or Leave it (TIOLI) Shed is coming soon to Bedford Hills!

 Volunteers will be necessary to run this program. Please fill out the form below if you are interested in volunteering for one or both of the positions described below.
  • TIOLI Assistant Head: to work closely with the TIOLI Head to schedule, manage and train volunteers and share in the duties required for effective operation and organization of the program. Either the Head or Assistant Head will need to be present during all hours the shed is operating (two Saturdays/month between the hours of 8am and 1pm).
  • TIOLI Saturday Volunteers: Assist with the set up, clean up, and operation of the TIOLI program for at least one 2-hour shift between 8am and 1pm, two Saturdays per month (May-October). Duties will include greeting customers, inspecting and displaying items, upholding order and safety in the parking lot.
TIOLI Volunteer Interest Form
If you check one or both boxes we will follow up with you once the program is closer to launch.

Meatless Monday Pilot Interest Form

The Bedford 2020 Food and Agriculture Task Force is considering running a campaign to encourage people to eat less meat to reduce their carbon footprint. A pilot program will test methods to encourage and support this behavior change and track participation with a pilot (test) group. If you are interested in being on the committee or being part of the pilot group, please fill out this form. Thank you.

Meatless Monday Pilot
If you click yes, we will contact you when the pilot is ready to launch to confirm that you want to participate.
If you check yes, we will contact you about coming to a committee meeting this fall.

Greenlight 2017-2018 GroupMe Chats

Please select the appropriate link below for your school’s Greenlight GroupMe Chat.  By selecting a link you will be joining a group message which Bedford 2020 will use to keep you updated and informed about the Changemaker 2020 Greenlight Award Competition.

 

Fox Lane:

John Jay:

Harvey:

Horace Greeley:

Rippowam Cisqua:

Hilltop Hanover CSA

Looking to try some new produce with exceptional taste and nutritional value? Marianna Fishman, Hilltop Hanover farmer and coordinator of adult programs, promises joining a CSA will provide you with these experiences and more.

 

A CSA, short for “Community Supported Agriculture” is a program which allows customers who pay upfront for a farmer’s whole season in exchange for receiving fresh produce weekly. Most CSAs run from June to October or November. One unique element of Hilltop Hanover’s 120 member CSA is the fact it runs market style.

“So a lot of CSAs, you come, you pick up a pre-made bag of food. Ours is set up almost as if you’re walking into a farm stand and you’re just picking and purchasing produce, with it nicely displayed and laid out. So that on the chalkboard it’ll say something like ‘Pick up a bunch of radish, a head of lettuce, two cucumbers, a half pound of eggplants’, and the consumer comes through the farmstand and picks up their vegetables,” said Marianna, adding that customers enjoy the experience of being able to have this extra element of choice. Hilltop Hanover also uniquely provides half shares for smaller families who don’t need such an immense amount of produce each week.

CSAs are perfect for people willing to experiment with new foods and cooking.

“You need to be somebody willing to be adventurous with your palate and experiment in cooking and trying new things, because we don’t want this produce we’ve worked so hard to grow to go right into the trash” said Marianna. 

Most members enjoy the exposure to new produce and the high quality of food so much that they return as members year after year.

“I think it becomes addicting to get well priced, local organic food. Once you pick up items from a farm that was harvested that day, and you see grocery store produce for what it really is–something that was shipped across the country or maybe from another country. It doesn’t have nearly the nutritional value, it doesn’t taste the same,” says Marianna.  “It’s empowering to be able to drive a couple miles and not just support a local farm, but also get produce that has a much higher nutritional quality than something you’d get in a grocery store.”

Mimi Edelman on the Westchester Grower’s Alliance

A unique support system for Westchester farmers, the Westchester Grower’s Alliance was established five years ago by Katonah farmer Mimi Edelman. Today, Edelman serves as president along with vice president Doug DeCandia and secretary/treasurer Deb Taft.

“We create a sense of support—if one of us do well, we all do well. We strengthen and empower each other,” said Edelman.

Along with support for fellow farmers, the Alliance works on issues of local food in the area. It has partnered with local organizations such as Harvest Community as well as county legislators to work on farming and food related issues.

The alliance is now on the verge of becoming a 501(c)(3) recognized nonprofit, hoping this transition will allow it to become more engaged in policy change and education of the community. With this development, Edelman also hopes to change the makeup of the organization.

“We are now developing our board–talking to individuals who come from diverse backgrounds and bring unique skill sets. Not necessarily farmers—we’re also looking for people who come from an environmental law perspective, or an agricultural, economic perspective,” she said.

This increased exposure to the community is especially essential at a time when the farming population is dwindling in Westchester.

“We are losing young farmers. There’s no infrastructure, no financial support, no land. So when you’re starting a farm, you can’t even expect to break even for 3-5 years. That’s realistic–you’re building up the soil, you’re building up your crop list, and you’re living hand to mouth. The farmers started migrating about 3 years ago–the new farmers, they started going north, to the upper Hudson Valley. They were able to get cheaper land, longer land leases,” said Edelman.

Speaking of the dwindling farming population in Westchester is a personal subject to Edelman, who has been forced to leave her land of eight years after the passing of her landowner.

“It’s a very bittersweet departure,” she said. “As a farmer I want to live in the community I feed, and that’s very difficult for me. Agriculture is one of the lowest incomes on the spectrum of professions, yet I feel it’s the most important–it connects people to the land, and it offers them food that is enlivened and full of the benefits, whether it be color, texture, nutrition.”

Edelman hopes expanding the support system of the Westchester Grower’s alliance will help attract and maintain Westchester farmers.

“There’s a romantic part of farming, and there’s the reality of foraging through fourth day of a heat wave. So it’s gotta be in your blood, it’s gotta be in your DNA. And if you have a support system around you, you might have a better chance than if you’re out there alone in your field.”

Despite all the challenges, Mimi has remained devoted to farming and plans on continuing it in her new land, on the North Fork.

“If you’re passionate about something, when you love something, it gives you that perseverance, if it’s something that doesn’t resonate with you in your heart and your soul it’s just going to feel like a chore.”

Social media and a website for the Westchester Grower’s Alliance is coming soon. Click here to read more about getting to know your local farmers and supporting their life-sustaining work!

Say hello to your farmer!

by Karen Simons

At Mobius Fields in Katonah, farmer Deb Taft is carefully harvesting produce whose flavors, fragrances, textures, color and nutritional benefit are at their peak. She is thinking of her farmers’ market customers while she harvests and looks forward to sharing her efforts. Saturday, at the market, you’ll find her quietly sitting behind her table, ready and willing to discuss the bountiful crops—how she grew them, how to store them, how to use them. 

At farm markets everywhere, local farmers love to talk to you about the products they are selling. Some farmers will speak to you as soon as you approach their stand, others like Deb, wait for you to ask the questions.

Next time you’re at the farm market take the time to chat with the person behind the table.

Not sure how to start?

Here are some quick tips:

  1. Ask what’s in season, and what’s coming up next. This is a great way to learn more about food seasonality and culture.  Farmers will tell you it’s best to tear up the shopping list and prepare meals made with fresh in-season ingredients. 
  2. See something you don’t recognize? Take the leap, ask what it is, how to store and prepare it. You’ll find some hidden treasures and expand your palate. 
  3. Learn about growing practices. If you want to eat foods raised without chemicals, ask farmers how the food is grown.  Not all farmers are certified organic but may have growing methods that meet or exceed organic certification standards.
  4. Get to know YOUR farmers. If you have time and are feeling chatty (and the farmers are not rushing to help customers) ask how is the growing season going?  How did you get into farming? Where are you located? Can I visit the farm?
  5. Give FEEDback! If you enjoy the food, make sure to go back and tell the farmer you purchased it from. Your positive feedback can help farmers decide what to grow in the future and if you’re lucky, you’ll reap the benefits next growing season!

There are lots of farm stands and farm markets to attend. Click here for our Northern Westchester/Lower Putnam map!

WillYUM Spice’s Curry Shrimp

Excite your senses with this spicy, flavorful dish from WillYUM Spice, which can be purchased at the John Jay Homestead Farm Market on Saturdays 9-1! 

McKay’s Curry Shrimp

 

Ingredients

2 lb clean deveined medium sized shrimp*

4 tablespoons WillYUM Spice™ McKay’s Curry

2 tablespoons WillYUM Spice™ Pepper’s Essence

1 tablespoon WillYUM Spice™ Turmeric

1 bulb of fresh garlic sliced

1/4 cup Chopped Scallions

1 tablespoon of Thyme

1 tablespoon Paprika

1 large sweet onion chopped

6 red or white small/medium potatoes cut into quarters

2 cups of no salt chicken broth (or vegetable broth)

*Click here to check that the shrimp you use is sustainable!

Sauté Shrimp with Salt and WillYUM Pepper’s Essence. Brown for 5 mins. Remove from pan and set aside

Cover a deep frying pan with olive oil. Add Garlic, Onions, Scallions, WillYUM McKay’s Curry, WillYUM Pepper’s Essence, WillYUM Turmeric, Sea Salt, and Paprika. Cook on Medium-Heat, stir and allow onions etc. to cook down for 2 to 3 minutes. Add potatoes and cook for 15 minutes.

Allow the potatoes to brown, add chicken broth. Cover and allow to cook down for 20 minutes on medium-high heat, turning occasionally.

Add cooked shrimp back in to the deep frying pan. Stir together and cook on low heat for 2-3 minutes.

Serve McKay’s Curry Shrimp with your favorite vegetable for your friends and family. Enjoy!

For an extra kick, garnish with WillYUM Red Pepper Flakes

Water and Land Use Task Force List

MEMBERS
campbell Elyse Arnow Brill
Pound Ridge Land Conservancy
needham Rod Christie
Executive Director, Mianus River Gorge
greco Lori Ensinger
President, Westchester Land Trust
greco Amy Gallen
Member, Rusticus Garden Club
mitchell Pat Kessee
Rusticus Garden Club
greco Nancy Kroenenberg
Member, Bedford Garden Club
needham Heather Langham
President of Board of Directors, John Jay Homestead
cutler Mimi Lines
Bedford Garden Club, Landscape Designer
needham Virginia Maybank
Co-founder, Branch Out!
Ann B. Paul
Director, Westmoreland Sanctuary
Karen Sabath Karen Sabath
Founder, Hudson Valley Natural Beekeepers, and Beekeeper, Rainbeau Ridge Farm
greco Simon Skolnik
Chair, Town of Bedford Conservation Board
greco Glenn Ticehurst
Principal, Benedek & Ticehurst
Don Weeden
Executive Director, Weeden Foundation