Local Food is all Around!

Farmers are growing fruits and vegetables, keeping bees, raising livestock, and tapping maple trees all around us.  Bedford 2020 has compiled a map of nearby farms and where they sell their produce to encourage you to buy local food!

Why buy local food? Buying local food supports the existence of local agriculture and supports our local economy. Food from these small farms is often better for the environment than food that travels long distances from giant agricultural operations. Food that is fresh and in season is good for you.  Finally, there is something amazing about the holistic experience of buying food directly from the farm or the farmer who grew it for you. So, buy local food!

Local Farm Map and List of Where to Buy Their Produce. The map and list below are color coded to help you understand where to buy produce from these farms:

Blue indicates you can buy at the farm because these farms that either sell their produce at a farm stand at or near the farm, through a CSA,* or offer U-Pick on the farm.
Brown indicates farms that distribute off-site to local establishments like restaurants or food markets.**
Green is for farmers markets that bring local farmers and artisans to a central location once a week to sell their produce and products.

If you have more accurate information that what we have here, please let us know and we will update this before we print it and create the interactive version on our website.

title-localfarms

Farms with Local
Farm Stands & CSAs

Amato Farm
121 Route 100, Katonah. Farm stand. AmatoFarm.com

E.B.’s Golden Harvest
Yorktown Heights. CSA, local markets. (914) 962-5666

Fable Farm
1311 Kitchawan Road, Ossining, CSA; Open to the public summer and fall Sat. and Sun. 9am-4pm. FableFoods.com

Farmer and the Fish
100 Titicus Road, North Salem. CSA, Farm stand: daily 10am–8pm, Sun. 10am–4:30pm. FarmerAndTheFish.com

Glynwood Farm
Cold Spring (not shown on map). CSA, Farm store: Tue. & Fri. 3pm–6pm, Sat. 9am–1pm, May–Oct. Glynwood.org

Harvest Moon Farm and Orchard
130 Hardscrabble Rd., North Salem. CSA, farm store: daily, 8am–6pm. HarvestMoonFarmandOrchard.com

Hemlock Hill Farm
500 Croton Ave., Cortlandt Manor. Local restaurants, Farm Store: daily 9am–5:30pm, Sun. 9am–2pm, year round. HemlockHillFarm.com

Hilltop Hanover Farm
1271 Hanover St., Yorktown Heights. CSA, U-Pick, Farm Stand: Sat. 10am–4pm. Farm stand: Fri. 1pm–6pm, Sat. 10am–4pm, June–Nov. HilltopHanoverFarm.org

John Boy’s Farm Outpost
John Boy’s farm is located up in Cambridge, NY, but he sells his products, local meats, and produce at The Outpost at 1 Court Rd. in Bedford Village.

Long Haul Farm
Garrison. CSA. LongHaulFarm

Meadows Farm
329 Underhill Ave., Yorktown Heights. Farm stand: daily 9am–6pm, Sun. 9am–5pm, May–Oct. MeadowsFarmMarket.com

Mill Pond Farm
121 Stone Hill Rd., Pound Ridge. Farm stand: daily.

Pound Ridge Organics
Route 124., Pound Ridge. Micro Farm, Organic Food CoOp; Member pick up Saturdays 12-2 (times may vary). Open year ’round. To join or visit call 914-764-3006 Pound Ridge Organics 

Rochambeau Farm
214 W. Patent Rd., Mt. Kisco. Farm stand: Thu. & Fri. 9am–6pm, Sat. 9am–5pm, Sun. 10am–4pm., seasonal. RochambeauFarmNY.com

Ryder Farm
400 Starr Ridge Rd., Brewster. Local markets, CSA, farm stand. RyderFarmOrganic.com

Salinger’s Orchard
230 Guinea Road, Brewster. Farm stand: 9am–5:30pm daily. SalingersOrchard.com

Snow Hill Farm
North Salem. Local markets, CSA. SnowHillOrganicFarm.com

Stone Barns
Pocantico Hills (not shown on map). CSA, Farm Stand: Sun. 10am–4pm, seasonal. StoneBarnesCenter.org

Stuart’s Fruit Farm
62 Granite Springs Rd., Granite Springs. U-Pick in fall, Farm stand: 9am–6pm daily. StuartsFarm.com

Thompson’s Cider Mill
335 Blinn Rd., Croton-on-Hudson. Farm store: Sat. & Sun. 10am–5:30pm, Sept.–Nov. ThompsonsCiderMill.com

Three Feathers Farm
371 Smith Ridge Rd., South Salem. Gossett Brothers Farmers Market, Farm stand: daily 7am–6pm. ThreeFeathersFarm

White Oak Farm
680 Croton Lake Rd., Yorktown Heights. Farm store: daily. WhiteOakFarm1.com

Wilkens Fruit and Fir Farm
1335 White Hill Rd., Yorktown. U-Pick: 10am–4:30pm. Farm market: 10am–5pm, Sept.–Dec. WilkensFarm.com

Farms that Sell and
Distribute Off-Site

Amawalk Farm
Katonah. Supplies John Jay Homestead Farmers Market. amawalkfarm.org

Amba Farms
Bedford Hills. Supplies Bedford Hills Farmers Market. AmbaFarms.com

Cabbage Hill Farm
Mt. Kisco. Supplies John Jay Homestead Farmers Market. CabbageHillFarm.org

I & Me Farms
Bedford Hills. Supplies area restaurants.

JD Farms
North Salem. Supplies John Jay Homestead Farmers Market. JDFarms.com

Kitchawan Farm
Yorktown.

Mobius Fields
Katonah. Supplies John Jay Homestead Farmers Market. MobiusFields.com

Muscoot Farm
Katonah. MuscootFarm.org

Sugar Hill Farm
Bedford Hills. WestchesterLandTrust.org

Sundial Farm
Ossining.

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John Jay Homestead Farmers Market
400 Jay St., Katonah. Sat. 9am–1pm, June–Nov. JohnJayHomestead.org

Muscoot Farmers Market 
51 Route 100, Katonah. Sun 10am–3pm, June–Oct. MuscootFarm.org

Chappaqua Farmers Market
Sat. 8:30am–1pm, year round. ChappaquaFarmersMarket

Croton-on-Hudson Farmers Market
1 Croton Point Ave. Sun. 9:00am–2pm, May-Nov. DowntoEarthMarkets/Croton

Gossett Brothers Farmers Market
1202 Route 35, South Salem. Sat. 9am–1pm, year round. GossettBrothers

Hudson Valley Regional Farmers Market
Brewster. Sun. 10am–2pm, year round. HudsonValleyRegional

Ossining Farmers Market 
140 Main St., Ossining. Sat 8:30am–1pm, June–Dec 27. DowntoEarthMarkets/Ossining

Pleasantville Farmers Market 
Summer: Memorial Plaza, Pleasantville. Sat. 8:30am–1pm, April–Nov. Winter:  Pleasantville Middle School Cafeteria, 40 Romer Avenue, 9am-1pm. PleasantvilleFarmersMarket.org

Tarrytown/Sleepy Hollow (TaSH) Farmers Market 
Patriot’s Park, Sleepy Hollow. Sun. 8:30am–2pm, June–Nov 19. TashFarmersMarket.org

We hope this map encourages you to get out there and meet your local farmers, frequent some farm stands,  check out the local farmers’ markets, and buy local food!

 *CSA stands for Community Supported Agriculture in which people sign up to buy a share of the farm’s harvest over a specific period of time in the future so that farmers may better plan for the season ahead.

**We have not listed local restaurants and establishments that sell produce from these farms on this map, but on the website version of this map/list we will provide links to farm websites so that you may look into where they distribute their produce.

Snow Hill Farm

Down a gravel driveway lined with trees through the green iron gate lie the beautiful hills of Snow Hill Farm in North Salem, NY. This picturesque setting is home to certified Black Angus cattle, chickens, Dorset sheep, Berkshire pigs, beehives, and two Maremma sheepherding dogs, along with several beautiful produce gardens. If you care about healthy, sustainably grown food, this farm is exactly the kind of place where you want your food to be grown! Snow Hill Farm is certified organic by both NOFA-NY and NOFA-CT. Not only does the farm raise healthy livestock, but it also produces delicious and organic produce available for sale in our area. 

Snow Hill Farm also partners with InterGenerate and Camp Morty to supply them with certified organic produce. Camp Morty hosts children from homeless shelters, in foster care, or on public assistance at a traditional summer camp experience. Each week both organizations pick up produce grown in the Snow Hill Farm gardens. Camp Morty recently used Snow Hill Farm zucchinis in a recipe to teach their campers a great way to enjoy vegetables.

Because they are certified organic, Snow Hill farm uses interesting techniques in its gardens to address insects without using pesticides or chemicals. We asked their farmer for a tip for our readers and she said, to prevent crickets from eating pepper plants, the farm cuts the bottoms out of plastic cups and place them over immature plant stems. Once the stems grow thick enough, the crickets will leave them alone.

If you are interested in products from Snow Hill Farm, you can sign up for their monthly newsletter and weekly emails to be notified about what produce, eggs, or proteins are available. The farm products are prepared at many local restaurants including Bedford Post Inn and Vox. You can purchase their products at The Market at Union Hall and Hayfields.

Intergenerate

 In Westchester County approximately 58,000 kids are food insecure. This means that they do not have reliable access to a sufficient quantity of affordable nutritious food. Food insecurity is even an issue in our own backyard- at Mt. Kisco Elementary School, 75% of the students are on the free or reduced lunch program.

The folks at a local nonprofit, InterGenerate, are working to do something about this. InterGenerate is an organization that creates environmental and social sustainability around shared concerns for food security.

At Arc of Westchester in Mt Kisco InterGenerate volunteers have started a co-op model garden where families each are assigned one day of the week where they work in the garden – weeding and watering and sharing the effort – and then each get some of the crops produced. As Susan Rubin, one of InterGenerate’s leaders, said, “We share equally in the work and in the harvest. Our goal is to grow enough food so that we’ve got plenty for participants and plenty left over for the community.  This model makes it easy for those who are brand new to gardening and for busy people who are unable to commit full time to a garden bed.” 

This program helps teach beginners how to garden and helps families build skills. Because it costs a lot to eat fresh local produce, this co-op system provides the participating families with healthy produce and also provides crops for the Neighbors Link community market.

There are two similar programs that InterGenerate helps manage. The co-op chickens at the John Jay Homestead are shared between 21 families- they share the workload and the eggs that the chickens produce. The Mt. Kisco Elementary School Garden is also a co-op garden managed by InterGenerate.

These programs work to establish a new food system and provide healthy and fresh food to those in need, while also having the families involved in and educated about its importance. If you want to get involved, check out InterGenerate’s website and instagram or email Dr. Susan Rubin at drsusanrubin@gmail.com or Mey Marple at marplegirl@me.com.

Roasted Broccoli Leaves Recipe

This is a great recipe from The Dig In to help reduce food waste and use ALL the parts of the fresh broccoli and cauliflower you can find in your garden or at the farm market now!
If you are interested in other delicious recipes that use the usually wasted part of broccoli and cauliflower, check out this article Taste it Don’t Waste it! Broccoli and Cauliflower Stems and Leaves.
Roasted Broccoli Leaves
Yields 5

Photo from TheDigIn.com

This is a delicious and healthy, salty snack. Once roasted, the broccoli leaves are a lot like chips.

Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
2 min
Total Time
15 min
Ingredients
  1. 5 large broccoli leaves with the stem removed and cut into 2 inch squares
  2. 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  3. 3/4 teaspoon sea salt
  4. 1/2 teaspoon cracked pepper
optional seasoning
  1. 1/8 tsp dried mint
  2. 1/8 tsp dried oregano
  3. 1/8 tsp parsley
Instructions
  1. Heat oven to 400F
  2. Combine leaves, oil and seasonings in a large bowl.
  3. Place a single layer of leaves on a baking sheet and keep a close watch on them in the oven. You want the edges to brown but not the whole leaf. If they burn the leaves will taste overly bitter.
Notes
  1. Great tip: If the coconut oil is solidified, place it in your hands and use them to apply the oil to the leaves.
By Jenni Lafferty

Growing Spinach

A delicious leafy vegetable that works well in any salad or cooked on its own, spinach has a vast array of benefits including improving eyesight, boosting metabolism, working as an anti- inflammatory, and helping to maintain blood pressure.

Did you know you can still plant spinach now for a fall harvest?

According to Epic Gardening, it is important to plant spinach at least one foot apart, so that there’s space for it to fill out. Plant in rich, well-drained soil.

Spinach seeds won’t germinate if the soil is too dry, so make sure– especially at the outset– that your soil stays damp. A spot with light shade is best for spinach; aim for three to four hours of sun a day. If your leaves are turning yellow, it may be a lack of nitrogen in the soil, so try adding a sprinkling of coffee grounds around the base of the plant.

 

The Mount Kisco Interfaith Food Pantry

Distributing more than just canned food

Made up of 13 different congregations in our community including 2 synagogues and 11 churches, The Mount Kisco Interfaith Food Pantry distributes to their clients 14 free meals worth of food for each family member, each week. In 2017 the Pantry served nearly 40,000 clients. The Pantry’s food distributions have increasingly included more and more fresh, local food.

In addition to supplying clients with traditional food pantry items like canned and packaged goods, dairy products and meats, the Pantry is also able to offer fresh local produce due to donations from area organizations.  Feeding Westchester (formerly the Food Bank for Westchester) provides free local produce twice a month; and every week in season, Hilltop Hanover provides fresh food from their farm to add to the Pantry’s food distribution to clients. Hilltop Hanover has already donated 3,534 pounds of food in 2018.

In the past the Pantry has also received produce donations from the Grafflin Elementary School garden in Chappaqua, the Mt. Kisco Elementary School garden, InterGenerate community garden in Mt. Kisco, and Steinhardt’s garden. They also receive donations from Panera Bread, Mt. Kisco bagels, and the Bagel Emporium in Armonk. 

According to Roberta Horowitz, the Director of the Mount Kisco Interfaith Food Pantry, “Clients love the program- they are always very excited to get the fresh produce. Healthy eating is very important to us.” That is why the Pantry also offers cooking classes that help promote healthy eating and icons displayed around the Pantry that show foods that are better for people with diabetes or high cholesterol, for example. 

If you are interested in getting involved, you can donate food or join the volunteers Tuesdays 5-7 pm or Wednesdays 9:30-11am.

As Roberta put it, “the Pantry is Community helping community, working together to provide the food to everyone who needs it.”.

Local Veggie Tacos

Truck’s Local Veg Tacos

Thanks to Nancy Roper for this recipe for the delicious Local Veg Tacos at Bedford’s Truck Restaurant!

Gather 4-6 varieties of vegetables–something rooty, something green, leafy, and something colorful. Some good examples are:

  1. purple top turnips or rutabaga
  2. one bunch of curly kale, bok choy, broccoli rabe, or swiss chard
  3. patty pan squash or yellow zucchini
  4. carrots

Peel turnip or rutabaga and cut into 1⁄2 inch cubes. Blanch cubes in salted boiling water, then shock in an ice water bath. Drain, dry, and toss in a tablespoon of oil (you can use olive oil, grapeseed oil, sunflower or safflower). Add salt to taste.

Spread cubes on sheet pan and roast in a 350° oven until edges are brown and cubes are tender.

For leafy greens, blanch in boiling salted water for one minute, then shock in an ice water bath. For swiss chard, separate colorful stems from the leaves and blanch separately. Drain the leaves and stems and dry as much as possible. Toss in a bowl with sea salt to taste, olive oil, and a teaspoon finely chopped garlic.

For squashes, you can cut into half circles. Butternut may be cut into 1⁄2 inch cubes. 

Patty pans are cut horizontally (about 1⁄4 inch thick) so they are pretty rounds.

Toss squash in olive oil and add salt to taste. Spread on a sheet pan, and bake about 7-10 minutes, until the edges are brown and the centers are tender.

To assemble the tacos:

We use organic blue corn, non-GMO tortillas. Briefly dip tortilla into

simmering water for 2 seconds, then place tortilla on an iron pan (medium high). When tortilla no longer is sticking to pan, flip.

Once all vegetables are separately prepared, mix together. This should be done just before assembling tacos. Heat the veg medley in an oven. After heating tortillas, place a scoop of hot veg filling into each tortilla. Top with fresh chevre (or feta), chopped basil, parsley, cilantro, thyme, or chives.

Serve immediately.

Truck Restaurant

Anyone who has driven by Truck in the evenings can attest to the completely full parking lots, something that does not even do justice to the true popularity of this local restaurant. Walking through the doors you are greeted by the tangling vines creating a miniature jungle winding along the steps, before you enter into the boisterous room and catching a glimpse of the many cakes and desserts temptingly on display. 

But while the ambiance and the subtle decor is delightful, it is the food made with fresh ingredients straight from the garden and local farms that has people coming back.  

We had a chance to catch up with Nancy Roper, the owner and founder of Truck to learn some of the secrets that help make the place run and flourish. Truck Restaurant purchases their ingredients from local farms including Sunsprout, Cabbage Hill, Fort Hill Farm, Riverbank, Blue Slope, Happy Acres, Beltane, along with three different places for farm fresh eggs. They also have smaller farms where they purchase more select and seasonable items such as rhubarb, yellow watermelon, or raspberries. Another source of their produce is Hudson Valley Harvest, a network that helps collect and distribute products from local farms to increase access to local food.

They also have a local garden behind the restaurant with different beds of veggies and herbs. Some of the beds are enclosed with bamboo teepees made by Truck’s carpenter from a local bamboo field. 

Everything Nancy grows in her home garden and at the Truck garden is used in the restaurant. From the different beds overflowing with basil and cilantro and a colorful assortment of herbs and vegetables, to the bright orange and blue flowers popping out from the teepees, it is clear that the ingredients used are top notch. The giant squash blossoms and ruby tomatoes are just so temptingly waiting to be picked. And the tip she swears by that makes her two gardens flourish- compost! She put it simply saying, “when the soil is healthy, plants are healthy, the good bugs and birds are healthy.” Their great composting makes for the delicious food that comes out in their kitchen. And if you want to try the local veggie tacos at home, check out the recipe courtesy of Truck Restaurant.

Like Nancy says, composting is key. If you want to start composting join our community compost program and get some tips for composting at home on our Get the Dirt on Compost page.

 

Ramp Drop Biscuts

Ramps (wild leeks) are a great way to ramp up any basic biscuit because they have a wonderful sweet, and mild onion flavor that works well with this simple side dish. Ramps are in season right now but they don’t last long. This delicious recipe is a great way to take advantage of ramps while they are still around for harvest at your local farmers market.

Helpful Tip

Ramps are younger, and skinnier work best in this recipe.  You can thinly slice the bulb and add it right in. If more mature ramps are the only ones available to you use only the leaves.

Recipe

John Jay Farm Market’s Early Season Surprises

John Jay Homestead Farm Market has plenty of early season surprises for all to discover! It may seem unlikely, for most, to find locally grown, organic food this early on in the season. Fortunately enough the John Jay Homestead Farm Market has a large variety of local vendors to supply plenty of new and delicious options for your table early this season. This year the Market was opened on May 12th and operates every Saturday from 10am to 2pm.

The John Jay Homestead Farm Market’s early opening is a great opportunity for customers. In the early season community members are able to speak with participating growers and producers, and learn more about what products to expect to see later on. There is no need to wait though! There are currently plenty of items available at the market to spice up any home cooked meal. A few of these foods include microgreens, apples, mushrooms and root veggies, not to mention fiddleheads, rhubarb and ramps. The last three items are highly sought after and have a small window of harvest, so go grab some while they’re still around.

Ramps (which are sometimes called wild leeks or spring onions) taste stronger than leeks, which generally have a mild onion taste.

 

 

Buying from a farmers market not only gets you better quality food, but also supports our local food system. Supporting local agriculture enables customers to source their own food,  which causes a positive ecological, economical and social impact. In fact, “Shopping with an exclusive network of farms and food artisans rather than large industrial farms customers are helping to fix the environmental damage done by the Big Agricultural companies,” says Vanessa Pahucki, the manager of the John Jay Farmers Market. Another great aspect of  small family farms is that they effectively put money back into the local economy through employment opportunities and spending at local shops for farming needs. Sustainably raised food tastes better too!

There is plenty to be excited about this coming year at the John Jay Homestead Farm Market! Vanessa Pahucki tells us that, “We now have a wine bar sponsored by Pizza Luca available,” and that, “Customers can enjoy picnics while eating lunch with an accompanying glass of wine and live music in the background, making John Jay Homestead a true destination on Saturdays.” There are also two new farms joining the market this year, Woven Hill and Gaia’s Breath. Don’t forget,  the John Jay Homestead Farm Market will be open until October 27th, so there is still plenty of time to make it a weekly habit!